On The Trinity Perspective, you will find those answers—or at least someone who asked the same questions. We have been in your shoes. The Trinity Perspective collects advice and stories from current students, parents, faculty, and alumni to share with you—prospective students, families, and the Trinity community.

By Mariah Wahl--

As a vegetable enthusiast and lover of all places where people frequently bring their dogs, it didn’t take much convincing for me to show up on Saturday for the grand opening of Trinity University’s first farmer’s market.

I arrived just as Trinity’s own improv group, Missed Opportunity, took the outdoor stage. Maddie Smith ‘16 gave a rousing impression of a mojito farmer in Tahiti, whisked away from his family by the lure of mojitos and mojito mango paletas (For those not in the know-- a paleta is a Mexican frozen treat like a popsicle, made from real fruit juice and chunks of fruit). The group performed a variety of hilarious hijinks, drawing on audience suggestions for their material. 

Missed Opportunity delivers a rousing comedic performance. 
Feeling hungry, I wandered over to the Umamita food truck and purchased a delicious pink smoothie, that somehow also contained vegetables. Like most people, I prefer to be healthy on accident. Sipping my smoothie, I wandered through the different booths, sampling everything from fudge, to black gold garlic, and even picking up a small rosemary plant from Trinity’s Community Garden. 

The different vendors boasted a variety of tasty-looking goods, often organic and locally sourced. Everything from dog treats, to green leafy vegetables, to beef, chicken, and pork, was available for the environmental and health conscious consumer. 

Some delicious, wholesome goods on sale at the Market. 
Maybe you’re thinking that free samples and organic food aren’t for you, though. Don’t worry-- the Trinity Market also offers a wellness activity every week! The grand opening featured an outdoor yoga class, led by Carlos, who also teaches at local studies the Union and 5 Points Local. As an ardent yet inexperienced yogi, the free class was a big draw. I had never done yoga outside before, but it was peaceful to look up at the blue sky and listen to the birds while we went through the poses. For the first time in my yoga practice, I even did a headstand, with (quite a bit of) help from Carlos.

The very picture of yogic serenity and grace. 
Rewarding myself with a vegetable tamale from La Hacienda, I walked through the vendors one last time and picked up my very own Trinity Market cloth bag for future Trinity Market excursions. Friends and family: you can now find me there every Saturday from 10 to 2.

You can probably find me petting a stranger's dog. 
Come join us at the Market every Saturday! There's something for everyone. Check out a list of vendors here.


About Mariah

Mariah Wahl is a senior at Trinity University, studying English and women's and gender studies. She edits the Trinity Perspective as well as the Trinity Experiential Learning Blog. In her free time, Mariah enjoys running and being outdoors. Recently, she completed her second half-marathon. She is a member of Sigma Theta Tau sorority.

By Mariah Wahl--

It is redundant to say that drinking is part of college culture. Movies, television, songs on the radio, stories told around campus—all celebrate college drinking, which often means drinking to excess. Frequently, these references elicit no more than a wink or an eye roll, if they’re acknowledged at all. The fabric of life on campus has drinking woven into it, whether or not students themselves drink. We can’t help talking or hearing about it. The stories of drunken escapades are often half the point of drinking in the first place.

The darker underbelly of binge drinking and blacking out is rarely acknowledged, but always understood as just beneath the surface of these stories. Sarah Hepola is no stranger to drinking culture and its slippery, sometimes terrifying, side effects.

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Students listen as a speaker discusses drinking and college culture


Experiencing a blackout for the first time at age 11, Hepola went on to have more than 200 episodes before she got sober. At a March 3 lecture in Laurie Auditorium, Hepola shared stories of insults delivered and forgotten the next morning; of having sexual encounters, then later hearing about them secondhand. She points out that this is the appeal of blackouts: “there’s a romantic oblivion about them.”

The entanglement of alcohol and sex is an especially difficult one. Jeremy Allen ‘07, coordinator for Fraternity and Sorority life at Trinity, notes how Hepola’s story might inspire students to think critically about their choices and how they impact others: “We know our students are drinking, and we want them to do it safely. Seventy percent of sexual assaults reported on Trinity’s campus involve alcohol consumption by one or both parties involved,” Allen says. “We have to navigate the relationship between alcohol and sexual assault as a community, and Sarah’s story helps to articulate how we might do so.”

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Hepola realizes that talking about alcohol and sexual violence is tricky. In an effort to avoid blaming victims of these crimes, alcohol is often left out of the conversation. Yet, because alcohol is such a prevalent factor in these cases, Hepola thinks it should be discussed: “It is a mistake not to talk about alcohol and what happens to all of us, men and women, when we drink to oblivion.”

Hepola describes how blackouts and consent create ambiguous situations. “Like a headache,” Hepola says, “only the person experiencing the blackout knows it’s happening. You can’t tell from the outside.” Many people appear to have full cognitive and motor function during a blackout. Memory loss has been recorded at a blood alcohol content of .07, still beneath the legal limit to drive. Hepola’s research found that people had flown airplanes and even performed surgery in a blackout. Therefore, Hepola reasons that it makes sense that someone in a blackout might cogently consent to sex and have no way of knowing whether or not they consented when they sober up. Another person in a backout might experience clear signs of incapacitation that prevent them from consenting to sex. “If you’re in a blackout,” Hepola asks us, “how do you know which blackout looks like you?”

For Hepola, this solution lies in a change of social culture. Speaking about the highly publicized case of rape in Steubenville, Ohio, Hepola was struck by one detail in particular. “One of the young men involved stopped his friend from driving that night. He knew his friend had been drinking too much to drive, but didn’t think to later say, ‘you are too drunk, and that girl is too drunk for you to be touching her.’” She notes that several years ago it was not commonplace to stop someone from driving while drunk. A similar social shift in terms of drinking culture and sexual assault might be a similar preventative.

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It's our responsibility to change the social dynamics of college drinking
That college students celebrate the lack of inhibition inherent in drinking is the core of the issue. Hepola points out the hypocrisy of a culture that glorifies incapacity: “Blackouts are not a sign of power any more than peeing the bed while drunk is a sign of power. Wouldn’t it be nice if we celebrated drinking with control?”

As she concluded her speech, Hepola’s final mantra was to “stay in the part of the evening you can remember.” It was impossible to listen to Hepola speak with such vulnerability and openness about her personal life and not be driven to consider her advice. College introduces plenty of overwhelming situations-- excessive drinking, sexual violence, and other faults major and minor. Sarah Hepola’s lecture suggests that it is within our power to change the circumstances of these situations gone awry. Her story empowers us to take control of our environment, and make Trinity a better place to work, learn, and live.

Visit these links to learn more about Trinity's resources and policy regarding alcohol, drugs, and sexual violence.


About Mariah


Mariah Wahl perspective Trinity college perspective
Mariah Wahl is a senior at Trinity University, studying English and women's and gender studies. She is the editor of the Trinity Perspective as well as the Trinity Experiential Learning Blog. In her free time, Mariah enjoys running and being outdoors. She recently completed her second half-marathon and she will attempt a full marathon in June unless she can get out of it. She is a member of Sigma Theta Tau sorority.


By Andrea Acevedo--

Whistle blows, hit the record button, follow the ball. GOAL! Zoom in on the emotion. Someone calls a timeout so I look over and Josh signals me to go to a commercial break, beautiful synchrony. I’m sitting in front of two screens with more panels and buttons than I know what to do with. Three camera operators, my fellow producer, our witty announcer, and I are Tiger Network.

The basic idea behind Tiger Network? The team films the game from three different angles, produces the footage into a nice video, and live streams it to families anywhere with an internet connection. Tiger Network helps families connect with their kids when they can’t be there in person to support their extracurricular activities.

Behind the scenes of Tiger Network, bringing you everything from sports to lectures to graduation. 
Most of the Tiger Networks time is spent filming athletic events that range from soccer games to tennis matches, but we dabble in anything that people off campus might want to watch, including lectures, commencement ceremonies, and band concerts.

There are some pretty amazing speakers that come to campus but unfortunately not all students are able to attend every one because college gets busy. This is where Tiger Network swoops in and makes FOMO no more! Miss a lecture that you really wanted to see? No problem, all you have to do is go to the tiger network website and scroll down to the available lectures and events, sit back and enjoy. During busy lectures even Laurie auditorium can get packed, this is what happened when Jane Goodall came to speak. Once again, Tiger Network to the rescue!
Most of the Tiger Networks time is spent filming athletic events that range from soccer games to tennis matches, but we dabble in anything that people off campus might want to watch, including lectures, commencement ceremonies, and band concerts.

There are some pretty amazing speakers that come to campus but unfortunately not all students are able to attend every one because college gets busy. This is where Tiger Network swoops in and makes FOMO no more! Miss a lecture that you really wanted to see? No problem, all you have to do is go to the tiger network website and scroll down to the available lectures and events, sit back and enjoy. During busy lectures even Laurie auditorium can get packed-- this is what happened when Jane Goodall came to speak. Once again, Tiger Network to the rescue!

Relive Jane Goodall and other intelligent, articulate lecturers.
Well, Jane Goodall was a fan. She went on to give those who might be listening at a distance a warm greeting in chimpanzee! See the video here on Tiger Network.

After my first shift ever, a soccer player from England walked by the Tiger Network table and yelled out, “Great reviews from back home, awesome work!” It was then I realized this wasn't just a great paying job but actually something really cool that parents and students alike could enjoy. It feels awesome to look at the stats that let us know how many viewers are tuning in and watching their friends and family play and perform.

Since joining Tiger Network I have gotten a pretty cool shirt and some really rad camera operating skills. And although I hate to admit it, I actually enjoy watching sports now… Sometimes... As long as it’s the Trinity Tigers.

Tiger Network let's students, alumni, and parents see the action from anywhere!

Watch Tiger Network for yourself at live.trinity.edu

About Andrea


Andrea Acevedo is a sophomore at Trinity University, she is thinking about majoring in Art History and Communications. She enjoys short walks on the beach, playing saxophone in the Trinity jazz band, and creating interesting food concoctions in the dining hall.