On The Trinity Perspective, you will find those answers—or at least someone who asked the same questions. We have been in your shoes. The Trinity Perspective collects advice and stories from current students, parents, faculty, and alumni to share with you—prospective students, families, and the Trinity community.

By Paige Roth '15

The Winter 2015 edition of the 1966 Journal of
Creative Nonfiction.
On Tuesday mornings in the campus coffee shop, you will likely find a group of five English students (including one Skyping in from study-abroad in Dublin) and one professor debating the merits of essays submitted by professional writers. These six women are the editors of 1966--a national literary journal of research based creative nonfiction--housed in Trinity's Department of English.


The journal, founded in 2013 by Dr. Kelly Carlisle and a small group of students, is committed to publishing both emerging and established names in the growing genre of creative nonfiction--first made famous by authors like Truman Capote and John McPhee. The journal continues to be student staffed. Their duties include reading and selecting submissions for publication, copyediting, fact checking, soliciting art work, or formatting the finished product. In its first year, three essays were listed as notable essays in Best American Essays.


While many students have the opportunity to intern at magazines or publishing houses, very few can call themselves "Assistant Editors" of a national literary journal by the time they graduate college. In fact, if you had told me I would have the authority to evaluate the work of professional authors and publish a nationally recognized journal before I graduated college--I probably would have laughed at you. As editors we have learned all facets of the publishing world--from the glamour of soliciting pieces from our favorite authors to sending rejection letters or sorting submissions in our never-ending inbox.

1966 editors (from left to right) Ileana Sherry, Ciara Bergin,
Josie Hammons, Sara Dibasi, Paige Roth, and Dr. Kelly
Carlisle discuss submissions.
Though 1966 meetings are generally full of hearty debate over our favorite pieces, giant white board outlines for magazine formatting or fact checking, or carefully crafting feedback to contributing authors--Dr. Carlisle ensures that we also make time for our own career exploration. During one of our favorite meetings, Dr. Carlisle invited a 1966 alumna who now works at Penguin Random House to Skype our editorial team and share her words of wisdom for launching a career in publishing. 

Beyond producing a professional magazine once a semester, 1966 is designed to give Trinity students the professional experience necessary to stand out in the real world. And though not all 1966ers plan to make a career in the world of publishing or magazine editing, we have all developed skills transferable to any industry.

To keep up with the 1966 team, be sure to check out the most recent edition and like us on Facebook!







To learn more about the Trinity University Department of English click here.

About Paige Roth
Paige Roth is a senior biology & English double major at Trinity and acts as editor of The Trinity Perspective. Throughout high school and the beginning of her time at Trinity, she identified herself as a strong humanities student. However, after a serendipitous meeting with her introductory biology professor, Dr. Jim Shinkle, she took her first tentative steps into the world of research where she’s studied cucumber sunburns ever since. Merging her loves of science and humanities in a true liberal arts fashion, Paige is now the author of Trinity’s Undergraduate Research blog. Paige enjoys all types of writing, from non-fiction to playwriting. In fact, she’s produced two plays off Broadway in New York and off Sunset in Hollywood. In her spare time Paige loves spin class, singing, running with the Dean of Students, and spending time with her residents as a resident mentor for first year student
By Paige Roth
Paige Roth
Paige Roth ('15)
Biologist & Playwright

When I thought of “science majors” as a high school student I pictured white lab coats, neat notebooks with prodigious calculations, and linear minds. Subconsciously I believed that science students possessed an inherent understanding of organic chemistry and physics hardwired into their DNA. Like blue eyes or brown hair—you either had it or you didn’t.

That being said, you can probably guess I wasn’t the strongest science student in high school. I was perfectly happy in my humanities centric bubble and my high school teachers encouraged me to stay the course and play to my strengths.  And during my first college semester, I did just that—took humanities courses that played to my strengths.

However, spring semester, I felt the itch of rebellion and enrolled in a biology course. Part of me found the topic—“Sex and Death”—inherently interesting. Part of me needed to prove something. And, one fateful night in a freshman biology lab, I got my chance. Dr. Shinkle made a general offer for scheduling help to a class of bleary-eyed freshmen.

Paige Roth Research Science Major
My first undergraduate research project involved the effects of UV light on cucumbers treated with a special "sunscreen" called LNNA.

Little did I know when I trundled to his office that night that this Stanford Ph.D. would spend an hour over a cup of coffee inquiring about my life. I had no idea that he would invite me to research in his biology lab simply because I demonstrated interest. I had no idea that this conversation would lead to a national research conference for the “average science student.” And I certainly had no idea that this was one of many hour long conversations I would have over coffee throughout my Trinity career with a brilliant professor who wanted nothing more than to encourage me to give science a shot.

Now this warm fuzzy endorsement on taking science courses by no means suggests that my time as a Biology major was easy. It was one of the hardest things I’ve ever done. I wrote paragraphs when I should have drawn molecules. I saw test scores better suited for a Walmart super savings deal than the letter grade. I wondered what the professors thought about my personal investment in their course as conveyed by my wardrobe and facial expressions rather than the material on the lecture slide. Suffice it to say, I wasn’t sure I belonged amongst my peers—science majors predestined by their genetic makeup.


Paige Roth and Lauren Goldberg research
My lab partner, Lauren Goldberg, and I check out a tissue sample with Trinity's new confocal microscope.
The End Result
I am now a Biology and English double major and lived to tell the tale. Classes like Organic Chemistry and Genetics may have been humbling (to say the least) but they taught me how to learn. This “strong humanities student” grew to love learning about science, despite its challenges (heck, I wrote an entire blog about it). I wish I could say this revelation stemmed from unfailing personal resolve and perseverance; but it really came from the support of peers, parents, and Trinity professors like Dr. Shinkle knew me well enough to say, “Don’t listen to those people who told you you can’t do science. I know you’ll prove them wrong, just like everyone else.”


About Paige Roth
Paige Roth is a senior biology & English double major at Trinity and acts as editor of The Trinity Perspective. Throughout high school and the beginning of her time at Trinity, she identified herself as a strong humanities student. However, after a serendipitous meeting with her introductory biology professor, Dr. Jim Shinkle, she took her first tentative steps into the world of research where she’s studied cucumber sunburns ever since. Merging her loves of science and humanities in a true liberal arts fashion, Paige is now the author of Trinity’s Undergraduate Research blog. Paige enjoys all types of writing, from non-fiction to playwriting. In fact, she’s produced two plays off Broadway in New York and off Sunset in Hollywood. In her spare time Paige loves spin class, singing, running with the Dean of Students, and spending time with her residents as a resident mentor for first year student


By Kalli Douma '18
Kalli Douma '18
Engineer & Athlete



When I arrived at Trinity I worried about my ability to balance my work load. As a first year, I did not know what to expect and with all of the anxieties that most incoming freshman have, I also had the stress of being a student athlete. As a member of the Trinity Women’s Soccer team, I knew that I would have to find a way to split my time efficiently between my school work and soccer. Luckily, I did not have to do it alone.

Trinity University Women's Soccer

One of the many perks to being a Trinity athlete is arriving at school to a group of returning players who have already mastered this balancing act. One of the first things we did as a team during preseason, and prior to class registration, was sit down with the returning players who are majoring in our fields of interest and they helped us design our schedule. I plan to major in Engineering and both a sophomore and senior helped me customize my schedule. They advised when it would be a good time to take classes and what times conflicted with practice or  could cause stress. They also explained how many hours would be too strenuous during season. This academic teamwork was my first taste of the life of a student athlete. As the season progressed, it became easier and easier to balance my time.

Trinity University Women's Soccer


"While long bus rides and overnight stays inevitably disrupted my usual study habits, champions adjust, so I did."

I also learned that part of this balancing act was to get enough sleep. Staying up until the wee hours of the morning would not only cause my grades to suffer but also my play on the field. So when it came time to sleep, I made the decision to go to bed, even if the homework was not finished. This only happened once before Lance Key, our head coach, began to give us days off proportional to our away trips and upcoming midterms. He even went as far as to base the roster for an away trip on the work load of each player. The heavier the work load the less likely we would be traveling that weekend.

Trinity University Women's Soccer

This is why Trinity athletes are so lucky. Because of Trinity’s DIII status, the players are specifically “student-athletes” - students first and athletes second, and as Coach Key says, "family first, soccer second, and soccer third." We are allowed to play the sports we love, and play them successfully as Trinity has won the SCAC’s President’s Trophy, an award given to the University with the best overall men’s and women’s sports teams, the past three years in a row. Trinity’s athletic resources allow for quality sports performance while the small-liberal-arts university atmosphere allows each athlete to be a student first and major in anything he/she chooses, which is not always true for DI and DII programs.